Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

In early December, it will be two years since my trip to the Galapagos Islands. It does not seem like it was that long ago, because the 8 days I spent in the Galapagos are still very vivid in my mind. That could be because of the many images from the trip that I occasionally see on my computer or Website.  I shot nearly 5,000 thousand RAW images in 8 days, with no bracketing. The Galapagos Islands are a naturalist’s and photographer’s paradise. The above image was taken on Espanola Island.

(Above image taken from the top of Bartolome.)  Traveling from island to island on the equator, as part of a small group of 17 people led by two local naturalist guides on a luxurious yacht, was an experience that will be difficult to match for many reasons to include the gorgeous blue Pacific Ocean, unusual landscapes that were formed by volcanos, and unique fauna and flora. Fortunately, Ecuador recognizes the value of the Galapagos and has designated it as a national park, and protects it from the outside world. Access to the islands is strictly controlled.

Above is a view of Darwin’s Lake on Santiago Island.

Reflecting back on that trip, this blog article is devoted to some of my favorite photographs from the Galapagos Islands. I have many favorites; therefore, selecting these images was difficult. More of my photographs from the Galapagos Islands can be seen at http://stabone.com/f214099363

Above are two adult Galapagos Tortoises enjoying a small pond and the mud. Adult tortoises can weigh nearly 1,000 pounds and live for 100 years. We were able to wander freely in an area where they were located on Santa Cruz Island.

Marine Iguanas (above) were on most islands, and we had to watch when walking because they were sunning themselves on the trails and were not afraid of people and easily approachable.

Above, another Marine Iguana and a unique view down its throat, and below is a Land Iguana on Santiago Island.

Above is a Red-Footed Boobie perched on a branch.

Above is a Sea Lion sprawled across the rocky coast of Playa Ochoa, and below are two Magnificent Frigate Birds on Santiago Island. 

Above is a closeup of a sea turtle on the shoreline of Santiago Island.

Above are two courting Masked Boobies on Espanola Island.

Above is a Sally Lightfoot Crab on Genovesa Island, and below is a bull Sea Lion with his harem on Espanola Island.

And finally, above is a Blue-footed Boobie chick huddled up, shy and hiding.

All of the above images are just a sampling of the many photographs I took while in the Galapagos Islands. I believe you will agree that the Galapagos Islands are very unique and a special place. If you have ever considered going, I strongly encourage you to do so. You will not regret it, even if you are not a photographer or nature lover.

Had to add one more…Blue-footed Boobie flying over a blow-hole on Espanola Island.

In case you were wondering or curious, I went to the Galapagos Islands with Expedition Travel, who did an incredible job of organizing and conducting the trip. I highly recommend them.

About Stephen L Tabone

Executive Consultant and Nature Photographer
This entry was posted in Galapagos Islands and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

  1. Anonymous says:

    great shots….the iguanas are really creepy looking…..thanks for sharing….MaryAnn

  2. researchlady says:

    I not only love the photos of all these beautiful and amazing creatures but I also enjoy reading your commentary for your wit and knowledge of the subject matter. I’m learning and enjoying myself at the same time! I’m amazed that you can remember all the names of the animals and places that you saw, did you keep a journal?

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